30
August
2017
|
10:15 PM
Europe/Amsterdam

UPDATE: FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm

testThursday, September 7, 2017, marks the closing of an 80-year era of historic records access to usher in a new, digital model. FamilySearch is discontinuing its microfilm circulation services in concert with its commitment to make billions of the world’s historic records readily accessible digitally online. (See FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm). As its remaining microfilms are digitized, FamilySearch has provided additional information to users of its historic microfilm program.

FamilySearch, a global leader in historic records preservation and access, began microfilming historic records in 1938. Advancements in technology have enabled it to be more efficient, making an unbelievable tide of digital images of historic records accessible much quicker online and to a far greater customer base.

FamilySearch released a list of helpful facts and tips to help patrons better navigate the transition from microfilm to digital.

QUICK FACTS AND TIPS

  • Patrons can still order microfilms online until Thursday, September 7, 2017.
  • After film ordering ends, if customers need access to a particular film yet to be digitized, they can express interest to have it added to the priority digitization list by contacting FamilySearch Support (Toll Free: 1-866-406-1830).
  • All of the microfilm rented by patrons in the past 5 years have now been digitized by FamilySearch—over 1.5 million microfilms (ca. 1.5 billion images).
  • The remaining microfilms are being digitally scanned at a rate of 1,000 films per day and are projected to be complete by 2020.
  • New digital images are available as they are scanned in the FamilySearch.org Catalog.
  • Films currently on loan in family history centers and affiliate libraries are automatically granted extended loan status.
  • Affiliate libraries now have access to nearly all of the restricted image collections as family history centers.
  • Visitors to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City will still be able to order needed microfilms to use during their research visits.

HOW TO FIND DIGITAL IMAGES ON FAMILYSEARCH

Digital image collections can be accessed today in 3 places on FamilySearch.org, all under Search.

  • Catalog. Includes a description of all the microfilms and digital images in the FamilySearch collection. This is where all of FamilySearch's digitized microfilm and new digital images from its global camera operations are being published. A camera icon appears in the Catalog adjacent to a microfilm listing when it is available digitally.
  • Records includes collections that have been indexed by name or published with additional waypoints to help browse the unindexed images.
  • Books include digital copies of books from the Family History Library and other libraries, including many books that were previously copied to microfilm.

For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org, or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?

“FamilySearch is committed to meeting customers’ needs as much as possible during this transition to digital access,” said Diane Loosle, FamilySearch’s Director of Patron Services. “We really appreciate the wonderful feedback we have received since the initial announcement. It is helping us better facilitate customer experiences during this next phase.”

Loosle said FamilySearch's over 5,000 family history centers will continue to provide access to relevant technology, premium subscription services, and digital records, including restricted content not available at home. Centers have the option to return microfilm that is available online or otherwise not needed. As more images are published online, centers may reevaluate whether to retain microfilm holdings.

See Frequently Asked Questions: Digital Access Replacing Microfilms for more information.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Comments 1 - 20 (36)
Thank you for your message.
Jocie McBride
18
April
2018
I would like to look at digital images of England, Gloucestershire, Bitton - Church Records.
Film Nos 4255099 and 4255062
Please would you tell me when these will be available or if I can see the films at Reading Family History Centre in Reading Berkshire England?
Thank you,
Jocie McBride
Sean Persson
18
March
2018
I would like to connect my family tree to my fathers tree, but I don’t know how to do so. Can I get some help?
Paul Nauta
21
March
2018
Your request has been submitted to support@familysearch.org. They will respond to your shortly. Thanks.
Louis Heyman
14
March
2018
Is it true that after a microfilm has been digitized that you cannot separate the different record sections on the film for publication, for example a film contains a record section of births of 1750-1800 and also a record section of births from 1960-1980. After digitization of the film, you have to publish the whole film or nothing when there are privacy concerns about the later dated records?
Judy
28
March
2018
Presently, it is true that we cannot publish just a section of a digitized film. This means if a section cannot be published due to contract or privacy issues the entire film will not be published. FamilySearch’s goal is to make records available to everyone insofar as possible. We are currently working on the capability to publish sections of a digitized film.
Miroslaw Kozak
08
March
2018
Sorry:
the correct is:
1.000 X 30 = 30.000 FILMS per month.
Where is 29.985 films????

Paul Nauta
21
March
2018
Not all digitized content is published immediately online. When images are published online, they are published in the FamilySearch Catalog usually first, then eventually in Historic Record Collections. You will need to frequent both sources to find the digital image content. See Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org (http://broadcast.lds.org/fhd/FH_Finding_Digital_Records_WEB.pdf), or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2bUqCIg_iA).
Miroslaw Kozak
08
March
2018
I see:
"The remaining microfilms are being digitally scanned at a rate of 1,000 films per day"
It means about 600.000 scans per day.
I see too February 12, 2018 - ONLY 9.394 NEW Digital Images:
https://media.familysearch.org/new-historic-records-on-familysearch-week-of-february-12-2018/
9.394 scans - it is about 15 fims per months...
1.000 X 30 = 30.000 scans per month.
Where are 29.985 scans?
Attila Sinkó
01
March
2018
Dear Family Search!
I would be very grateful if you could place on a priority digitalization list the below films:
632538 ( Bokor, Kereszteltek, Házasultak, Halottak)
Thank you for your help and assisstance,
your faithfully,
Attila Sinkó
Judy
07
March
2018
Attila,

Please contact FamilySearch Support to submit your request for film digitization. To contact support go to
https://familysearch.org/ask/help. Select option Send a Message. To send a message, select a message category, provide your contact information, and compose your email message. An agent reviews your email message and provides an email response. An agent may call you to better understand the issue.
Carol McRobb
12
February
2018
Hello their is no image for the records I need. How can I view them. Thank you
Paul Nauta
21
March
2018
Carol,

It would help if you could provide us with more details to support your inquiry. Which collection or record # are you seeking? You might also want to see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org (http://broadcast.lds.org/fhd/FH_Finding_Digital_Records_WEB.pdf), or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2bUqCIg_iA).
Alan Tennuchi
08
February
2018
Really disappointed with the closure of the London Hyde Park FH Centre. All of the films were moved to the National Archives in Kew which was OK but now that they have been transferred [given to] the Society of Genealogists [SoG] in London. If I want to look at them, I have to pay for the privilege of doing so. Thoroughly dissapointed with this decision. They get them free from the Church and then charge members of the Church to look at them. Not every member has access to the internet.
Sándor Hegyi
05
February
2018
Tisztelt Családfa kutatás!
Először is szeretném megköszönni azt a hatalmas munkát, amit Önök végeznek a mi nagy-nagy örömünkre és elégedettségünkre! Köszönet érte! A továbbiakban azt szeretném kérdezni illetve kérni, hogy az én kutatási területem Eger vonatkozásában mikorra várható a még hiányzó két tekercs mikrofilm digitalizálása? Amely a következő: Halottak:1852-1857, Film szám:623836, Kereszteltek:1852-1894, Film szám:623843. Nagy szükségem volna ezen filmeken található adatokra a továbbiakban, hogy tovább tudjak lépni a Családfa-m tovább fejlesztése érdekében! Nagy tisztelettel kérem tehát Önöket, hogy ha lehetséges ezt a két tekercs filmet szíveskedjenek digitalizálni és részemre hozzá férhetővé tenni! Megértő támogatásukat és fáradozásukat előre is nagyon szépen köszönöm.
További tisztelettel:
Hegyi Sándor
Magyarország
V Lee
02
February
2018
The new policy of restricting home access to images is extremely disappointing. However you spin the reason, the bottom line becomes more apparent. My spouse has been a transcription volunteer and he will now curtail this activity. You don't get free labor and then deny these contributors access. Shame.
Michael Greenstreet
23
January
2018
Very disappointing. I understood that I could go to catalog and find the microfilm for Virginia counties that I'm researching and find the microfilm digitized. I find references to books, but where are the digitized microfilm records?
Judy
05
February
2018
There are many digitized records for Virginia that can be accessed through the catalog. We are also continuing to digitize more records. Here is a link to an article that may help you find the digital images - How to Find Digital Images on FamilySearch.
Ferenc
09
January
2018
Dear FamilySearch,

First of all thank you for your hard work with microfilms.

I would like to ask you to digitalize Hungary, Csongrád, Csány "Házasultak 1787-1895" 688144 and "Halottak 1787-1895" 688145.
My second request: please check film 5848302. This should contains "Csongrád, Halottak ~1918-1921", but it said: "Page Not Found"

Thank you in advance!
Paul Nauta
12
January
2018
Ference,

You can submit the film # and description of those you'd like to see placed on a priority digitization list to support@familysearch.org. If they are not on the list currently, they will be added. I have forwarded your additional questions to the catalog team for review. Thank you.

Paul Nauta
Frank Alan Forster
02
January
2018
History of the Hartley family in Boston area of Lincolnshire
Paul Nauta
12
January
2018
Frank,

Your question is high level. You can search the FamilySearch Catalog and Books to possible histories of the Hartley family you are seeking. You can also look in the FamilySearch Wiki for additional ideas.
Fodorné Bozó Brigitta
30
December
2017
Dear FamilySearch,
I'm very thankful for the opportunity to search for my family's history because of you. However, the page doesn't have some essential informations to continue my researches. If it doesn't bother you much, I would like to ask you some questions about their whereas.
First, I would like to ask you when you will be able to digitalize Hungary, Somogy, Andocs (házasultak, halottak) 699927 film and Hungary, Csongrád, Mindszent (házasultak, halottak) 688297-688302 films?
Another question I would like to bother you with: I was flattered to notice see Hungary, Kalocsa (halottak)DGS 8265983 was digitalized. My question would be: when is it expected to have the format readable?

Thank you very much for your hard work,
Mrs. Fodor
Paul Nauta
12
January
2018
Mrs. Fodor,

Please submit your request for film digitization to support@familysearch.org. Thank you.
Nancy
23
November
2017
Microfilms that I used to order have been digitized, which is great....but....they are available at my local FHC ONLY with the logon of a church member. So that means they are no longer accessible to non-LDS members. This is certainly a step backwards in terms of access.
Marilyn Sliva
17
January
2018
Non LDS members can definitely access the digitized records at FHC - I do it every week. You just have to log on to their computers (which should already be set up to go to the correct page). Of course, as of December you have to have a free account set up, but that's no big deal.
Trudy Lusk
21
November
2017
Are we not able to access the probate and deed books online from home any longer? Even though they are not indexed, I used to be able to get to the digital images and look through them using the original book indexes. Now there's an icon with a key and a message comes up saying the images are not available.

Is there a subscription required or something? Please let me know.

Trudy Lusk
Diane C Loosle
17
November
2017
Gene. I am happy to know that you listened into the interview which I gave. The microfilm that you mention was already digitized at the time that you requested it, however, it had some issues with rights restrictions which needed to be resolved before it could be published. The good news is the film of interest is available digitally as of two days ago through the FamilySearch Catalog viewer. Another thing that I mentioned in the interviews is that even though we may digitize a film, we may not have the rights to make it available due to data privacy or other rights restrictions. Data privacy laws change overtime, necessitating our pulling back records that were previously available. In some cases other rights restrictions mean we cannot share the records digitally. Many of you may have noticed a new icon in the FamilySearch Catalog which is a camera with a key over it. That icon means that there is a restriction that only allows the images to be viewed while in a FamilySearch Library, Family History Center or Affiliate Library. There are even a few images which are not available to Affiliate Libraries due to rights restrictions. If that sounds complicated, it is. You can imagine the mammoth task of reviewing 1000s of contracts which govern our microfilm collection. This takes time. So please have patience. Also remember that the films are still available in locations at FamilySearch Libraries, Family History Centers and Affiliate Libraries. The FamilySearch Catalog let's you know where you can find a copy of the microfilm.
Phillip Lambert
13
November
2017
HELP. Im at the FRC in Temple View Fosters Rd, Hamilton, New Zealand. I cannot figure out how to view the restricted digital images of the digitized microflim. No one in the center knows how to access them either. The IP Address for this center is 118.92.57.58. Does that help?
Gene Zubrinsky
09
November
2017
In an August 22 interview, Diane Loosle, Director of Patron Services for FamilySearch, said the following: "You know if you think about how long it took to get a microfilm to be delivered to you once you ordered it, you can think about it’s kind of the same time frame when it might then be available to you digitally." She also said that the rate of digitization is 1,500 films per day; this page says 1,000. Either way, it's difficult to comprehend why my six-weeks-old (September 27) digitization request for _Baptismal Records of the First Congregational Church, 1710-1820 [Middleborough, Mass.]_, FHL microfilm no. 945018, still fails to show up in the catalog as fulfilled. The typical turnaround time for film orders was a couple of weeks. What, please, is the story? Thanks.
Carli McK
27
October
2017
Are Slovakia Church records not "available online" able to be viewed at a FHC? Nothing indicates such, but I am curious. Thank you.
Joe
19
January
2018
Carli, when you are not at an FHC and try to access records that need to be viewed at an FHC, you will see a key icon above the camera icon. When you click on that, you will see a message indicating that to access the image, you need to go to a family history center. Otherwise, the images are not available at the family history center either. Unfortunately, there is a portion of Slovakia microfilms (less than 15%) that are not yet available online, due to current restrictions. FamilySearch hopes to make these available in the future.