30
August
2017
|
10:15 PM
America/Denver

UPDATE: FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm

testThursday, September 7, 2017, marks the closing of an 80-year era of historic records access to usher in a new, digital model. FamilySearch is discontinuing its microfilm circulation services in concert with its commitment to make billions of the world’s historic records readily accessible digitally online. (See FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm). As its remaining microfilms are digitized, FamilySearch has provided additional information to users of its historic microfilm program.

FamilySearch, a global leader in historic records preservation and access, began microfilming historic records in 1938. Advancements in technology have enabled it to be more efficient, making an unbelievable tide of digital images of historic records accessible much quicker online and to a far greater customer base.

FamilySearch released a list of helpful facts and tips to help patrons better navigate the transition from microfilm to digital.

QUICK FACTS AND TIPS

  • Patrons can still order microfilms online until Thursday, September 7, 2017.
  • After film ordering ends, if customers need access to a particular film yet to be digitized, they can express interest to have it added to the priority digitization list by contacting FamilySearch Support (Toll Free: 1-866-406-1830).
  • All of the microfilm rented by patrons in the past 5 years have now been digitized by FamilySearch—over 1.5 million microfilms (ca. 1.5 billion images).
  • The remaining microfilms are being digitally scanned at a rate of 1,000 films per day and are projected to be complete by 2020.
  • New digital images are available as they are scanned in the FamilySearch.org Catalog.
  • Films currently on loan in family history centers and affiliate libraries are automatically granted extended loan status.
  • Affiliate libraries now have access to nearly all of the restricted image collections as family history centers.
  • Visitors to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City will still be able to order needed microfilms to use during their research visits.

HOW TO FIND DIGITAL IMAGES ON FAMILYSEARCH

Digital image collections can be accessed today in 3 places on FamilySearch.org, all under Search.

  • Catalog. Includes a description of all the microfilms and digital images in the FamilySearch collection. This is where all of FamilySearch's digitized microfilm and new digital images from its global camera operations are being published. A camera icon appears in the Catalog adjacent to a microfilm listing when it is available digitally.
  • Records includes collections that have been indexed by name or published with additional waypoints to help browse the unindexed images.
  • Books include digital copies of books from the Family History Library and other libraries, including many books that were previously copied to microfilm.

For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org, or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?

“FamilySearch is committed to meeting customers’ needs as much as possible during this transition to digital access,” said Diane Loosle, FamilySearch’s Director of Patron Services. “We really appreciate the wonderful feedback we have received since the initial announcement. It is helping us better facilitate customer experiences during this next phase.”

Loosle said FamilySearch's over 5,000 family history centers will continue to provide access to relevant technology, premium subscription services, and digital records, including restricted content not available at home. Centers have the option to return microfilm that is available online or otherwise not needed. As more images are published online, centers may reevaluate whether to retain microfilm holdings.

See Frequently Asked Questions: Digital Access Replacing Microfilms for more information.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Comments 1 - 20 (49)
Thank you for your message.
Sherry
28
June
2018
When will Slovakia Church and Synagogue Books, 1592-1935, GS Film Number 1924887 images be available to view?
Cynthia Christ
04
June
2018
Hi, There are several records that I want to review. Access to each record requires me to sign into FamilySearch as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in order to view the images. I've had a sign-in with FamilySearch for years. From time to time, I've been a member of Ancestry. I would like to access these records -- Film 72899, 72900, 1732565, 1732567, 1732571 and 998663. I live in Santa Fe, NM. Thus, I'm not very close to a center that may have them. How can I get access? Are they available on Ancestry?

Thanks,
Cynthia
Sur
03
June
2018
Hi, Your help is very much appreciated. I used to go all the time to check microfiches, and I understand the service has been discontinued. I found a lot of new records that have been indexed in Family Search. When I click the camera icon to see the record, it directs me to:
To view these images you must do one of the following:
Access the site at a family history center.
Access the site at a FamilySearch affiliate library.

When I click at any of the links, it directs me to a map. Does that means that I need to go to the closest family center to get the copy of the documents?

thanks in advance for your help.
LL
Ann Berry
31
May
2018
On my Family tree my Grandmother is in the place of my Mother wich I have been unable to move. This seems to have happened when the format changed. Although i have seen where I can change this on other member of the family I am unable to change this one. So I have lost all the other connection to my Maternal Grandmother and Grandfather. Can you help? as this error has lost me year of work
Mary Cure
28
May
2018
I am looking for information about my great grandmother Her marriage certificate states she was born 1855 in the state of Tennessee.Her name is Lucinda Logsdon maiden name Lee according to the marriage record. She married Robert L or R Logsdon in 1877 and she died in Dec. 1894. That"s all the information I have and I have not been able to go back any farther on her family. I don"t know her race or anything so any additional information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
Bob Douglas
28
May
2018
This has been helpful, however although I can acces most Lancashire wills online, a lot of the things I would like to see are only available and an FHC, will have to find the time to go
Angela Fischer
21
May
2018
Why are some digital images only available for LDS members? The ones I'm referring to are German parish records (filM numbers 1055969, 1055970 & 1055971). If they are digitized and no longer available through microfilm loan, why aren't they being shared with everybody?
Judy
29
May
2018
FamilySearch's goal is to make records available to everyone insofar as possible. Indeed, sometimes contracts with archives or other partners limit the ability to do so. FamilySearch is making every effort to reduce restrictions through ongoing negotiations.
Justin Rittwage
11
May
2018
I cannot access the following film numbers:
69829
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/391181?availability=Family%20History%20Library
All these films
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/75620?availability=Family%20History%20Library
All these films
Where do I find out where they are located isn't there some program for films to see where they are located at?
Judy
29
May
2018
These films have a contract restriction that requires you to sign in to FamilySearch as a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in order to view the images. FamilySearch's goal is to make records available to everyone insofar as possible. Indeed, sometimes contracts with archives or other partners limit the ability to do so. FamilySearch is making every effort to reduce restrictions through ongoing negotiations.
walter spillman
06
May
2018
can not get past my 5x grandfather Samual Spillman born 1794 in Barren,kentucky. Death 16 July 1851 in Fort Branch.In
Patricia Ann Howell
04
May
2018
I interested in finding great-great grandfather of my mother on her father's side. My mom, Ules Mitchell Howell alias Eulas Clabern or Clabron Mitchell Howell, born in Florence AL--February 22, 1915 to Argro H.(father DOB: Nov 6, 1890) and Auggie(mother) Mitchell, born in Killens Lauderdale Cnty AL. Mom's grandfather Clabern or Clabron and Mary F. Mitchel (DOB: Feb 1871) of Poplar Springs Lauderdale County, AL. I will be priviledged to know who my mom's great grandfather is. Some last names that I have are Guess or Guesp supposedly of Native American decent and some family member migrated to Oklahoma. I gathered this information before the passing of my last aunt on mom's side about five years ago. Your assistan
Joan Morris
02
May
2018
I am interested on how to go about finding if a certain book has been digitize at the Mormon site. The current book I am interested in is Texas Texans or Texans Texas. Also anything pertaining to Czechs that came to Texas. Any help would help. Surnmames Holubec, Hranicky and Zajicek. Also German surnames: Laake and Matheaus.
Mary Grace Zaccaria, Local History Librarian
02
May
2018
Hello
I am the local history librarian at the Sussex County Main Library in Newton, NJ. I am learning the local genealogy and in charge of maintaining the collection. I was told from a local historian that your organization might be able to come in and digitize our microfilm collection. The person has visited you there and says that you do provide this service for no cost. Our collection has various microfilms newspaper records. We have microfilm of the NY Times and NJ Herald 1849- present. We also have the Sussex County Independent dating back from 1873-1952. Also, we have microfilm of the Wantage Recorder years 1894-193, The Sussex Register 1823-1943. We also have 1860s maps of Sussex County including Road Maps of Newton, Morris County and parts of Warren County. In our vertical files which you can view online we have extensive family records that are paper files. We have both Cemetery and Church paper files of Morris, Sussex and Warren counties.
Would you be interested in evaluating our collection as a possible project for digitization? Perhaps we can partner through a NJ initiative that might sponsor a grant for this collaboration?
Thank you for your kind consideration.
Please call or write if you are interested.

Mary Grace Zaccaria,
Local History Librarian
Sussex County Library System
Main Library
125 Morris Turnpike
Newton, NJ 07860
973-948-3660
victor petchey
02
May
2018
I have been searching for a step sister for many years I was told she did live in matlock in the peak district I know she married name was Hammond but divorced and shange her name can you help
Jocie McBride
18
April
2018
I would like to look at digital images of England, Gloucestershire, Bitton - Church Records.
Film Nos 4255099 and 4255062
Please would you tell me when these will be available or if I can see the films at Reading Family History Centre in Reading Berkshire England?
Thank you,
Jocie McBride
Judy
29
May
2018
The films you asked about are in an index-only collection. It was created from microfilm copies and has not yet been linked to digital images. FamilySearch will eventually do a project to add links to the digital images. In the meantime, you can access images of the records by doing the following:
1. When you search for an individual in the index database and click to view the record details, look for the GS Film Number. (This is the microfilm number used to index that record.)
2. Go to the Catalog on FamilySearch.org. (You can find it by clicking on Search in the top menu.)
3. In the Catalog, click on Film/Fiche search, enter the GS Film Number you found in the record.
4. You will see a collection title (or a list of titles) that are included on that microfilm. Click on a title to see a catalog description.
5. In the catalog description, scroll down to the Film/Digital notes section and find the microfilm number in the Film column.
6. If there is a camera icon in the Format column, then the microfilm has been digitized and you can click to view it. This will give you access to a digital copy of the entire microfilm. You will need to browse the images to find the record. (Some digital images may require viewing at a family history center or FamilySearch affiliate library.)
8. If there is no camera icon, but just a microfilm icon, then the microfilm is not yet available digitally. A microfilm copy is available at the location shown just above the beginning of the Film/Digital Notes. (You can click the down arrow on that location to select other family history centers or affiliate libraries to see which films are available there.)

We recognize this is not the best experience and we hope to simplify this in the future by providing direct links to digital images from these older index-only databases. With millions of records being added each year to FamilySearch.org, it may take some time for older collections like this to be enhanced.
Sean Persson
18
March
2018
I would like to connect my family tree to my fathers tree, but I don’t know how to do so. Can I get some help?
Paul Nauta
21
March
2018
Your request has been submitted to support@familysearch.org. They will respond to your shortly. Thanks.
Louis Heyman
14
March
2018
Is it true that after a microfilm has been digitized that you cannot separate the different record sections on the film for publication, for example a film contains a record section of births of 1750-1800 and also a record section of births from 1960-1980. After digitization of the film, you have to publish the whole film or nothing when there are privacy concerns about the later dated records?
Judy
28
March
2018
Presently, it is true that we cannot publish just a section of a digitized film. This means if a section cannot be published due to contract or privacy issues the entire film will not be published. FamilySearch’s goal is to make records available to everyone insofar as possible. We are currently working on the capability to publish sections of a digitized film.
Miroslaw Kozak
08
March
2018
Sorry:
the correct is:
1.000 X 30 = 30.000 FILMS per month.
Where is 29.985 films????

Paul Nauta
21
March
2018
Not all digitized content is published immediately online. When images are published online, they are published in the FamilySearch Catalog usually first, then eventually in Historic Record Collections. You will need to frequent both sources to find the digital image content. See Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org (http://broadcast.lds.org/fhd/FH_Finding_Digital_Records_WEB.pdf), or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2bUqCIg_iA).
Miroslaw Kozak
08
March
2018
I see:
"The remaining microfilms are being digitally scanned at a rate of 1,000 films per day"
It means about 600.000 scans per day.
I see too February 12, 2018 - ONLY 9.394 NEW Digital Images:
https://media.familysearch.org/new-historic-records-on-familysearch-week-of-february-12-2018/
9.394 scans - it is about 15 fims per months...
1.000 X 30 = 30.000 scans per month.
Where are 29.985 scans?
Attila Sinkó
01
March
2018
Dear Family Search!
I would be very grateful if you could place on a priority digitalization list the below films:
632538 ( Bokor, Kereszteltek, Házasultak, Halottak)
Thank you for your help and assisstance,
your faithfully,
Attila Sinkó
Judy
07
March
2018
Attila,

Please contact FamilySearch Support to submit your request for film digitization. To contact support go to
https://familysearch.org/ask/help. Select option Send a Message. To send a message, select a message category, provide your contact information, and compose your email message. An agent reviews your email message and provides an email response. An agent may call you to better understand the issue.
Carol McRobb
12
February
2018
Hello their is no image for the records I need. How can I view them. Thank you
Paul Nauta
21
March
2018
Carol,

It would help if you could provide us with more details to support your inquiry. Which collection or record # are you seeking? You might also want to see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org (http://broadcast.lds.org/fhd/FH_Finding_Digital_Records_WEB.pdf), or watch this how-to video “Where are the digitized records on FamilySearch?” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2bUqCIg_iA).