26
June
2017
|
06:43 PM
America/Denver

FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm

FamilySearch, a world genealogy leader and nonprofit, announced today its plans to discontinue its 80-year-old microfilm distribution service. The transition is the result of significant progress made in FamilySearch’s microfilm digitization efforts and the obsolescence of microfilm technology. The last day for ordering microfilm will be August 31, 2017. Online access to digital images of the world's historic records allows FamilySearch to service more people around the globe, faster and more efficiently. See Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org and Frequently Asked Questions

A global leader in historic records preservation and access, FamilySearch and its predecessors began using microfilm in 1938, amassing billions of the world’s genealogical records in its collections from over 200 countries. Why the shift from microfilm to digital? Diane Loosle, Director of the Patron Services Division said, "Preserving historic records is only one half of the equation. Making them easily accessible to family historians and researchers worldwide when they need them is the other crucial component."

Loosle noted that FamilySearch will continue to preserve the master copies of its original microfilms in its Granite Mountain Records Vault as added backup to the digital copies online.

As the Internet has become more accessible to people worldwide over the past two decades, FamilySearch made the decision to convert its preservation and access strategy to digital. No small task for an organization with 2.4 million rolls of microfilm in inventory and a distribution network of over 5,000 family history centers and affiliate libraries worldwide.

It began the transition to digital preservation years ago. It not only focused on converting its massive microfilm collection, but also in replacing its microfilm cameras in the field. All microfilm cameras have been replaced with over 300 specialized digital cameras that significantly decrease the time required to make historic records images accessible online.

FamilySearch has now digitally reproduced the bulk of its microfilm collection—over 1.5 billion images so far—including the most requested collections based on microfilm loan records worldwide. The remaining microfilms should be digitized by the end of 2020, and all new records from its ongoing global efforts are already using digital camera equipment.

Digital image collections can be accessed today in three places at FamilySearch.org. Using the Search feature, you can find them in Records (check out the Browse all published collections link), Books, and the Catalog. For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org.

Transitioning from microfilm to digital creates a fun opportunity for FamilySearch's family history center network. Centers will focus on simplified, one-on-one experiences for patrons, and continue to provide access to relevant technology, popular premium subscription services, and restricted digital record collections not available to patrons from home.

Centers and affiliate libraries will coordinate with local leaders and administrators to manage their current microfilm collections on loan from FamilySearch, and determine when to return films that are already published online. For more information, see Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Comments 1 - 20 (104)
Thank you for your message.
Elizabeth Benetti
23
October
2018
I cannot travel to use a Library computer to research any more [ which was over an hour each way] and l can find the films l would like to view on my home computer but they are locked. will these always be locked or is there a way l can view here at home Thanks
pane
05
October
2018
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Frank Wallace
31
July
2018
Just joined Ancestry.com. Looking for data concerning Robert Wallace (came from Ireland abt. 1776 to Maryland and probably died there). Looking for data concerning Arthur Wallace (son of Robert) and died in Ohio County, KY in 1823. Looking for data concerning Charles Wallace (brother of Arthur) and he died in Ohio County, KY.
Kim weith
21
July
2018
I am looking for survivors named ca. 1700 to 1900. Portz, sampson, merkling, and pequot Indians. Name to be nimrod ? ( ca 580 to ca 1637 )

Thank you for your time

Kim
Mary Grace Zaccaria, Local History Librarian Sussex County Libra
07
June
2018
To the Family Search Organization:
I was interested in finding out if you take on any volunteer projects to digitize collections? We currently have 253 reels of local history newspapers in our microfilm collection Dating from 1800s - 2000s. I am very interested in getting all of our collection digitized including our historical Church Records and Family Records now all on paper documents. I was told by a local Genealogist in New Jersey that you might be interested in digitizing our records free of charge. I was wondering if you had such an outreach program of digitizing the microfilm and or paper documents, and what I might do to make this possible?
Thank you in advance.

Mary Grace Zaccaria
Local History and Genealogy Librarian
Main Library
Sussex County Library System
125 Morris Turnpike
Newton, NJ 07860
973-948-3660- ext 3410
Christopher Clark
31
May
2018
Hello,

I am trying to view the image (microfilm image?) from the following record. A link is available to view the record but it does not work on my PC, iPad or phone. Is there a way to view this? Thank you for your help.

Chris

Record Collection:
Wiki LinkJamaica Births and Baptisms, 1752-1920

Document Information:
Indexing Project (Batch) Number I03874-6
System Origin Jamaica-EASy
GS Film number 1291713
Reference ID item 1 v 4 p 314 Portland
Citing this Record
"Jamaica Births and Baptisms, 1752-1920," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XNKJ-QYF : 11 February 2018), Fanny Holmes in entry for William Robinson Clarke, ; citing Jamaica, reference item 1 v 4 p 314 Portland; FHL microfilm 1,291,713.
Gayle Soren
18
May
2018
My father microfilmed several of his journals.
What is the simplest way to digitize them? Does the family history Library provide any services? Do you recommend a company? Is there any used or new equipment we could buy? We do have a scanner. Do we need a microfilm reader? What are the steps to digitizing?
john machledt
07
May
2018
I am looking for a book you have on microfilm named "Waller--A Family History" by J. Ralph Dickey. It is on FHL #1321014, #8. What can I do to get the microfilm; I do not believe it has yet been digitalized. I live in Connecticut and am working through the Bridgeport Public Library, History Center. Thank you.
Monica Dressler
06
April
2018
I've inherited 3 file drawers full of microfiche records 80's & 90's Genealogy & Ancestry
Before I throw them out, do they have any value?
Thank you
Monica
Laura Persello
28
March
2018
Looking for birth records for Amos LeFevre born around 1856 Flanders Belgium. He emigrated to the USA, when?
Barbara Cox
27
March
2018
How does a patron request that vital records from Antigua are digitized? Her email address is yvythom@gmail.com
Paul Nauta
27
March
2018
Barbara:

Please contact FamilySearch Support to submit your request for film digitization. To contact support go to
https://familysearch.org/ask/help. Select option Send a Message. Provide your contact information and include the microfilm numbers for those you are requesting to be digitized.
Hans
25
March
2018
How do I get to the movie Nr 1194705 please?
Judy
18
April
2018
RE: Film #1194705
The access rights for this film is identified as restricted due to data privacy laws. All or part of this film contains records that fall within the data privacy laws. This means if a section cannot be published due to privacy issues the entire film will not be published. FamilySearch’s goal is to make records available to everyone insofar as possible. We are currently working on the capability to publish sections of a digitized film.


Linda
20
March
2018
In recent months I've been able to view digitized images of old NYC vital records at my local family history center, but now when I search the transcribed records at home there's a message that there is no image available. Previously when you searched the catalog and a camera icon appeared it would state you had to go to a family history center or affiliate library to view the image. Now there's a camera icon (which indicates an image) but when you click on the printed record it states no image available. What happened? Are the old NYC vital records still available for viewing at a local family history center?
Marilyn Jackson
16
March
2018
Escalante, Utah LDS Ward Records
Dave M
16
March
2018
thanks for your great work


i am trying to get a scan of a document
but unfortunately of Familysearch i can see the document only if I'm a member of the Mormon Church. what I'm not or in a Family History Center but unfortunately they've all closed there doors in Western Europe lately
so would you be able to get me a scan?


An image of this record can be viewed on FamilySearch/LDS microfilm #2405341-4.
https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007811122?cat=1691266
Sam Smith
10
March
2018
It looks like most northern italian catholic church records are not yet scanned. (Bedonia, Tarsogno, etc). Is there an idea when these records might be scanned for availability online?
Farid cheb
26
February
2018
F
Alan Cobb
25
February
2018
How do I connect my MRN number to ancestry.com to enable me as a church member to get free geneology on Ancestry.
Kurt
18
February
2018
I was big in to researching my family history back in 2004. I utilized your family history center in Plainview, NY and viewed microfilm rolls from Germany. I see now that this has ended. Will these rolls be made available online? I was looking for vital records from Gross-Peterwitz, Wanowitz, Zauchwitz...Germany.
Frances Fournier
14
February
2018
Indice del Ramo de Ynquisición [i.e. Inquisición

I was hoping to view the above but when I click on the link I get the following message:You do not have sufficient rights to view the requested object

Only a limited number of users can view this object at the same time, and viewers must be in the Family History Library, a partner library, or a Family History Center. If you are in one of these locations and are receiving this message, the user limit has been exceeded. Please try again later.

What should I do at this point? Is the Vancouver Public Library a partner library?

Many thanks. Frances