26
June
2017
|
06:43 PM
Europe/Amsterdam

FamilySearch Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm

FamilySearch, a world genealogy leader and nonprofit, announced today its plans to discontinue its 80-year-old microfilm distribution service. The transition is the result of significant progress made in FamilySearch’s microfilm digitization efforts and the obsolescence of microfilm technology. The last day for ordering microfilm will be August 31, 2017. Online access to digital images of the world's historic records allows FamilySearch to service more people around the globe, faster and more efficiently. See Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org and Frequently Asked Questions

A global leader in historic records preservation and access, FamilySearch and its predecessors began using microfilm in 1938, amassing billions of the world’s genealogical records in its collections from over 200 countries. Why the shift from microfilm to digital? Diane Loosle, Director of the Patron Services Division said, "Preserving historic records is only one half of the equation. Making them easily accessible to family historians and researchers worldwide when they need them is the other crucial component."

Loosle noted that FamilySearch will continue to preserve the master copies of its original microfilms in its Granite Mountain Records Vault as added backup to the digital copies online.

As the Internet has become more accessible to people worldwide over the past two decades, FamilySearch made the decision to convert its preservation and access strategy to digital. No small task for an organization with 2.4 million rolls of microfilm in inventory and a distribution network of over 5,000 family history centers and affiliate libraries worldwide.

It began the transition to digital preservation years ago. It not only focused on converting its massive microfilm collection, but also in replacing its microfilm cameras in the field. All microfilm cameras have been replaced with over 300 specialized digital cameras that significantly decrease the time required to make historic records images accessible online.

FamilySearch has now digitally reproduced the bulk of its microfilm collection—over 1.5 billion images so far—including the most requested collections based on microfilm loan records worldwide. The remaining microfilms should be digitized by the end of 2020, and all new records from its ongoing global efforts are already using digital camera equipment.

Digital image collections can be accessed today in three places at FamilySearch.org. Using the Search feature, you can find them in Records (check out the Browse all published collections link), Books, and the Catalog. For additional help, see Finding Digital Images of Records on FamilySearch.org.

Transitioning from microfilm to digital creates a fun opportunity for FamilySearch's family history center network. Centers will focus on simplified, one-on-one experiences for patrons, and continue to provide access to relevant technology, popular premium subscription services, and restricted digital record collections not available to patrons from home.

Centers and affiliate libraries will coordinate with local leaders and administrators to manage their current microfilm collections on loan from FamilySearch, and determine when to return films that are already published online. For more information, see Digital Records Access Replacing Microfilm.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Comments 1 - 20 (96)
Thank you for your message.
Monica Dressler
06
April
2018
I've inherited 3 file drawers full of microfiche records 80's & 90's Genealogy & Ancestry
Before I throw them out, do they have any value?
Thank you
Monica
Laura Persello
28
March
2018
Looking for birth records for Amos LeFevre born around 1856 Flanders Belgium. He emigrated to the USA, when?
Barbara Cox
27
March
2018
How does a patron request that vital records from Antigua are digitized? Her email address is yvythom@gmail.com
Paul Nauta
27
March
2018
Barbara:

Please contact FamilySearch Support to submit your request for film digitization. To contact support go to
https://familysearch.org/ask/help. Select option Send a Message. Provide your contact information and include the microfilm numbers for those you are requesting to be digitized.
Hans
25
March
2018
How do I get to the movie Nr 1194705 please?
Judy
18
April
2018
RE: Film #1194705
The access rights for this film is identified as restricted due to data privacy laws. All or part of this film contains records that fall within the data privacy laws. This means if a section cannot be published due to privacy issues the entire film will not be published. FamilySearch’s goal is to make records available to everyone insofar as possible. We are currently working on the capability to publish sections of a digitized film.


Linda
20
March
2018
In recent months I've been able to view digitized images of old NYC vital records at my local family history center, but now when I search the transcribed records at home there's a message that there is no image available. Previously when you searched the catalog and a camera icon appeared it would state you had to go to a family history center or affiliate library to view the image. Now there's a camera icon (which indicates an image) but when you click on the printed record it states no image available. What happened? Are the old NYC vital records still available for viewing at a local family history center?
Marilyn Jackson
16
March
2018
Escalante, Utah LDS Ward Records
Dave M
16
March
2018
thanks for your great work


i am trying to get a scan of a document
but unfortunately of Familysearch i can see the document only if I'm a member of the Mormon Church. what I'm not or in a Family History Center but unfortunately they've all closed there doors in Western Europe lately
so would you be able to get me a scan?


An image of this record can be viewed on FamilySearch/LDS microfilm #2405341-4.
https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007811122?cat=1691266
Sam Smith
10
March
2018
It looks like most northern italian catholic church records are not yet scanned. (Bedonia, Tarsogno, etc). Is there an idea when these records might be scanned for availability online?
Farid cheb
26
February
2018
F
Alan Cobb
25
February
2018
How do I connect my MRN number to ancestry.com to enable me as a church member to get free geneology on Ancestry.
Kurt
18
February
2018
I was big in to researching my family history back in 2004. I utilized your family history center in Plainview, NY and viewed microfilm rolls from Germany. I see now that this has ended. Will these rolls be made available online? I was looking for vital records from Gross-Peterwitz, Wanowitz, Zauchwitz...Germany.
Frances Fournier
14
February
2018
Indice del Ramo de Ynquisición [i.e. Inquisición

I was hoping to view the above but when I click on the link I get the following message:You do not have sufficient rights to view the requested object

Only a limited number of users can view this object at the same time, and viewers must be in the Family History Library, a partner library, or a Family History Center. If you are in one of these locations and are receiving this message, the user limit has been exceeded. Please try again later.

What should I do at this point? Is the Vancouver Public Library a partner library?

Many thanks. Frances
Robert Howard
03
February
2018
I am trying to track down microfiche of the "Howard-Comer Genealogical Collection." These records were compiled by Ida Pauline (Howard) Comer and Lucy Howard. When they died the records were donated to the University of Georgia and are stored there under the title given above. Some time prior to their donation they were reportedly copied on microfiche. I have looked through the FamilySearch catalog and called FamilySearch. The help line could not locate the records either using the U of G title on the two sisters names. Since the records were filmed before they were donated to the University of Georgia, it is likely they are not cataloged as the "Howard-Comer Genealogical Collection."

Is there some other way to search the microfiche? Is there another group that might have done the filming?
Paul Nauta
07
February
2018
Robert,

We regret to inform you that we do not have this microfiche in our collection, and neither could we find any information about another filming. Sorry we could not be more helpful in your quest. Thank you.

Susan Howard
13
January
2018
I am researching Italian records (birth, marriage and deaths from small towns) on the Familysearch site. Most of the records are restricted and have to be viewed at a FHC. However, for the town of Atina there is a sub-section of records with the word Tribunale in front of them that I CAN access at home, e.g., Italia, Frosinone, Atina. Stato civile : Tribunale, 1809-1929. The list below that, Registri dello stato civile di Atina (Frosinone), 1810-1865, is restricted to FHC viewing. Why on earth would the records with the word Tribunale before them be unrestricted? I have asked the Help team but got no proper answer.
Joe
22
January
2018
Susan, this is due to a fairly common situation where original records for the same town are kept in separate archives. Records from different archives will generally have a different contract and may have different access conditions. FamilySearch strives to make records available as widely and as freely as possible, insofar as contractual or other legal conditions allow. We hope that, in time, restrictions may be eased to allow more records to become available at home.
Valarie
22
December
2017
I apologize if this has been previously answered directly but, I can't seem to find a direct answer. Like most of non-members we are grateful for he access to the records our public entities have given permission for the church to scan and now digitize. I do understand that some records do have access restrictions. I appreciate the opportunity to visit an affiliate library or FHC. My concern lies in the idea that there is ONLINE access restrictions to public information for non members while members of the church CAN access the information w/ their LDS log in. I can't imagine that the LA State Archives gave permission to scan/digitize public records yet, restricted it to only LDS log in access while denying that same access to non church members. While I hope I am wrongm it feels as though familysearch is becoming much more exclusive or just bad negotiating by the state of Louisiana.
Paul Nauta
22
January
2018
FamilySearch is a global nonprofit that digitizes billions of genealogically significant historic records and provides convenient, economical access to the broadest possible audience—the vast majority of which have completely free access to everyone. Access limitations are set by the archive and governing privacy laws. The only records from the LA state archives that have an access restriction are vital records. The LA state archives relies on revenues from these records to help pay archive employee wages. Selling copies of vital records adds to the state archive’s limited budget.

LA state archives doesn’t have the means to have all of these records digitally preserved. FamilySearch, a nonprofit of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, digitizes the records for free, and helps drive needed traffic to the archive’s website. In return, members of the LDS faith can view images of these records on FamilySearch.org and non-LDS patrons can view them free of charge at any of FamilySearch’s 5,000+ FamilySearch Centers.

In essence, LDS members pay for access to these records through their tithes and donations to the Church. When applicable, non-LDS members can pay for access on a per-view basis on the record custodian’s site or usually access the collection for free by frequenting their closest FamilySearch Center.
Penny Minter
20
December
2017
I am looking for New York Marriages, 1686-1980. If the microfilm is not yet digitized and microfilm is no longer available for loan, how can I obtain a copy of a record?
Thank you.
Joe Everett
22
January
2018
Penny, the historical records collection you asked about is an index-only collection. It was created from microfilm copies and has not yet been linked to digital images. FamilySearch will eventually do a project to add links to the digital images. In the meantime, you can access images of the records by doing the following:
1. When you search for an individual in the index database and click to view the record details, look for the GS Film Number. (This is the microfilm number used to index that record.)
2. Go the the Catalog on FamilySearch.org. (You can find it by clicking on Search in the top menu.)
3. In the Catalog, click on Film/Fiche search, enter the GS Film Number you found in the record.
4. You will see a collection title (or a list of titles) that are included on that microfilm. Click on a title to see a catalog description.
5. In the catalog description, scroll down to the Film/Digital notes section and find the microfilm number in the Film column.
6. If there is a camera icon in the Format column, then the microfilm has been digitized and you can click to view it. This will give you access to a digital copy of the entire microfilm. You will need to browse the images to find the record. (Some digital images may require viewing at a family history center or FamilySearch affiliate library.)
8. If there is no camera icon, but just a microfilm icon, then the microfilm is not yet available digitally. A microfilm copy is available at the location shown just above the beginning of the Film/Digital Notes. (You can click the down arrow on that location to select other family history centers or affiliate libraries to see which films are available there.)

We recognize this is not the best experience and we hope to simplify this in the future by providing direct links to digital images from these older index-only databases. With millions of records being added each year to FamilySearch.org, it may take some time for older collections like this to be enhanced.

Terry Brasko
09
December
2017
Where is my closest FamilySearch affiliate library? I live in Maple Shade NJ. Thanks!!
Carolina Woods
31
December
2017
The nearest one I found to Maple Shade NJ is:

Cherry Hill New Jersey Family History Center
252 East Evesham Road
CHERRY HILL New Jersey 08003-3706

+1 856-795-8841
Hours
T,Th 6:30pm-9 pm; W-Th,Sat 9:30am-2:30pm.
Richard F. Vernon
28
November
2017
Why have I been blocked from accessing my LDS family tree? I have been with you for at least ten years, and have enjoyed being part of it. When you became part of Ancestry.com, I was given the opportunity to remain as an old free member and to continue using it. Now all of the family data is not available to use, and I think that it is unfair for me to not be able to see and use it, or retrieve to save for my family to see. What can I do? I am 84 yrs. old, and have limited income, and would like to at least keep the family info, that I have on family search. How do I do this? Thank you for your interest in my situation.
Paul Nauta
28
November
2017
Richard, You should not be blocked from accessing your FamilySearch Family Tree. I'm wondering if you're confusing FamilySearch.org with Ancestry.com because you of your statement "When you became part of Ancestry.com..."? FamilySearch is not part of Ancestry.com other than we share different types of select data from our historic record collections and tree. I'd suggest you contact FamilySearch Support for the personal assistance you need. FamilySearch Support: 1-866-406-1830. Thank you.
Frank Bax
25
November
2017
It began the transition to digital preservation years ago.

I'm guessing about 10-15 years ago. Does anyone know when scanning of microfilm actually started?
Paul Nauta
28
November
2017
Frank,

FamilySearch began digitizing its microfilm in 1999. Thank you for your interest.
Kieran
22
November
2017
I was wondering if anyone was having trouble accessing family search records that are restricted to LDS login?
As a couple of weeks ago I was able to get a copy of a marriage certificate in the USA which really helped me.
However how all i get is go to a center or an affiliated library.
Just wondering whats going on and should i be able to download images on my Family Search Account.

Thanks
Jenn
13
December
2017
I am having the same problem, I get a pop up notification saying I need an LDS membership number or I need to go to a Family History Library. I dont have a LDS membership number and I Dont have a library with hours near me that works for my schedule. Has anyone figured out how to see these images at home?

Thanks
Valarie
22
December
2017
I hope someone will answer us. Same thing here w/ images. I had a dedicated church member download it for me but, my REAL CONCERN is why some online images are available only to LDS members? For non members it requires a trip to the FHC. I can't imagine a state archive would have knowingly negotiated that only Church members had online access to the public records they let the church scan. I would like to know if this is a new restriction placed by the church. If so, I just would like a direct answer...and hope my state negotiates a lil better next time!